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Code Compliance of the Day Article 


We here at the IEC NY Chapter have created this to better help you to perform code compliant work. 

Our main goal is to help you stay on top of the NEC codes and power company regulations here in NY state. These statements are all based from the NEC 2017.

  • 3 May 2020 2:07 PM | Rob Bellinger (Administrator)

    517.16

    (A) Inside of a Patient Care Vicinity. An isolated grounding receptacle shall not be installed within a patient care vicinity.

    (B) Outside of a Patient Care Vicinity. Isolated ground receptacle(s) installed in patient care spaces outside of a patient care vicinity(s) shall comply with 517.16(B)(1) and (2).

    (1) The grounding terminals of isolated ground receptacles installed in branch circuits for patient care spaces shall be connected to an insulated equipment grounding conductor in accordance with 250.146(D) in addition to the equipment grounding conductor path required in 517.13(A).

    The equipment grounding conductor connected to the grounding terminals of isolated ground receptacles in patient care spaces shall be clearly identified along the equipment grounding conductors entire length by green insulation with one or more yellow stripes.

     (2) The insulated grounding conductor required in 517.13(B)(1) shall be clearly identified along its entire length by green insulation, with no yellow stripes, and shall not be connected to the grounding terminals of isolated ground receptacles but shall be connected to the box or enclosure indicated in 517.13(B)(1)(2) and to non–current-carrying conductive surfaces of fixed electrical equipment indicated in 517.13(B)(1)(3).


  • 3 May 2020 2:05 PM | Rob Bellinger (Administrator)

    210.8(B)

    Other Than Dwelling Units. All single-phase receptacles rated 150 volts to ground or less, 50 amperes or less and three-phase receptacles rated 150 volts to ground or less, 100 amperes or less installed in the following locations shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel.

  • 3 May 2020 2:01 PM | Rob Bellinger (Administrator)

    110.26 (A) (4)

    Where equipment operating at 1000 volts, nominal, or less to ground and likely to require examination, adjustment, servicing, or maintenance while energized is required by installation instructions or function to be located in a space with limited access, all of the following shall apply:

    (a) Where equipment is installed above a lay-in ceiling, there shall be an opening not smaller than 559 mm × 559 mm (22 in. × 22 in.), or in a crawl space, there shall be an accessible opening not smaller than 559 mm × 762 mm (22 in. × 30 in.).

    (b) The width of the working space shall be the width of the equipment enclosure or a minimum of 762 mm (30 in.), whichever is greater.

    (c) All enclosure doors or hinged panels shall be capable of opening a minimum of 90 degrees.

    (d) The space in front of the enclosure shall comply with the depth requirements of Table 110.26(A)(1). The maximum height of the working space shall be the height necessary to install the equipment in the limited space. A horizontal ceiling structural member or access panel shall be permitted in this space.


  • 8 Mar 2020 4:35 PM | Rob Bellinger (Administrator)

    695.15

    A listed surge protection device ( SPD ) shall be installed in or on the fire pump controller.


  • 8 Mar 2020 4:32 PM | Rob Bellinger (Administrator)

    690.7

    690.7 Maximum Voltage. The maximum voltage of PV system dc circuits shall be the highest voltage between any two circuit conductors or any conductor and ground. PV system dc circuits on or in one- and two-family dwellings shall be permitted to have a maximum voltage of 600 volts or less. PV system dc circuits on or in other types of buildings shall be permitted to have a maximum voltage of 1000 volts or less. Where not located on or in buildings, listed dc PV equipment, rated at a maximum voltage of 1500 volts or less, shall not be required to comply with Parts II and III of Article 490.

    (A) Photovoltaic Source and Output Circuits. In a dc PV source circuit or output circuit, the maximum PV system voltage for that circuit shall be calculated in accordance with one of the following methods:

    (1) Instructions in listing or labeling of the module: The sum of the PV module–rated open-circuit voltage of the series connected modules corrected for the lowest expected ambient temperature using the open-circuit voltage temperature coefficients in accordance with the instructions included in the listing or labeling of the module

    (2) Crystalline and multicrystalline modules: For crystalline and multicrystalline silicon modules, the sum of the PV module–rated open-circuit voltage of the series connected modules corrected for the lowest expected ambient temperature using the correction factor provided in Table 690.7(A)

    (3) PV systems of 100 kW or larger: For PV systems with a generating capacity of 100 kW or greater, a documented and stamped PV system design, using an industry standard method and provided by a licensed professional electrical engineer, shall be permitted.


  • 1 Mar 2020 10:51 AM | Rob Bellinger (Administrator)

    406.3(F)

    Receptacle with USB Charger. A 125-volt 15- or 20-ampere receptacle that additionally provides Class 2 power shall be listed and constructed such that the Class 2 circuitry is integral with the receptacle.

  • 1 Mar 2020 10:47 AM | Rob Bellinger (Administrator)

    210.11(C)(4)

    Code Change Summary: A new code section was added to require a 20 amp circuit for a dwelling unit garage.

    Similar to the requirements in the NEC for 120-volt, 20 amp circuits in the bathroom, laundry and kitchen areas of a dwelling, now one is required for dwelling unit garages.

    Not all dwelling units have a garage. For those that do, whether attached or detached, if the garage is supplied with electric power, at least one 120-volt, 20-ampere branch circuit must be installed to supply garage receptacle outlets.

    The intent of the code change was to address the use of cord and plug connected garage appliances and many portable tools that commonly draw 12 to 16 amps. This is just too much for the typical 15 amp garage branch circuit that often supplies the garage lighting outlet as well.

    The last sentence of the code change states that this garage circuit shall have no other “outlets”. This means anything besides garage receptacle type outlets. The way the code change is written, it would be a code violation to supply the garage lighting outlet from this branch circuit, but the exception allows the circuit to also supply “readily accessible outdoor receptacle outlets”.

    “Readily accessible outdoor receptacle outlets” are those receptacles that can be reached without using a portable ladder (see Article 100 definition of Readily Accessible). Holiday lighting receptacles up under the eaves will most likely be accessible rather than readily accessible.


  • 29 Feb 2020 8:23 AM | Rob Bellinger (Administrator)

    Section 210.8 ( B ) ( 9 )

    All single-phase receptacles rated 150 volts to ground or less, 50 amperes or less and three -phase receptacles rated 150 volts to ground or less, 100 amperes or less installed in non-dwelling unit crawl spaces are now required to have GFCI protection.

  • 29 Feb 2020 8:21 AM | Rob Bellinger (Administrator)

    Code Change Summary: A new code section was added to require GFCI protection for lighting outlets in crawl spaces.

    Lighting outlets, not exceeding 120 volts, in a crawl space now require GFCI protection. Most likely, the electrician will just supply them through a switch fed from the load side of a GFCI protected receptacle in the crawl space to comply with the new requirement. Another option is to use a GFCI type circuit breaker where the branch circuit originates.

    It is important to keep in mind that Article 100 defines an “Outlet” as “A point on the wiring system at which current is taken to supply utilization equipment”. Many people think that only receptacles are considered outlets. A lighting “outlet” in a crawl space is any luminaire or light fixture located in the crawl space.

    This code change is not specific to dwellings or non-dwellings. It applies straight across the board to any crawl space.

    The intent of the change was to protect those working in the crawl space from accidentally breaking an unprotected lamp and getting shocked from the exposed filament. Many have argued that it would be better to properly protect the lamp if it is exposed to physical damage rather than risking being in the dark if the crawl space luminaire goes off after the GFCI device trips.


  • 27 Feb 2020 1:57 PM | Rob Bellinger (Administrator)

    Arc-Flash Hazard warning, service equipment 110.16 ( B )

    A new list item ( B ) was added requiring non-dwelling unit service equipment rated 1200 amperes or more to be labeled with the normal system voltage, available fault current, clearing times, and date the label was applied.


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